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Christmas in Paraguay!


If you're wondering what Paraguayans do at Christmastime, they have some great traditions, including the "noche buena" meal on Christmas Eve at midnight.  They eat lots chipa guasu (a type of corn casserole, stay tuned for a recipe), asado or grilled meat (some eat it cold), salads, especially fruit salad, watermelon and drink mucho terere.


Families travel from all over the country, many even return from working in other countries like Brazil, Argentina, and Spain, to celebrate with loved ones. This is us at last year's Kurrle celebration in Asuncion. Festivities are anything but a silent night with fireworks, loud music and drinking cidra (hard cider). 



Most Paraguayans do not decorate Christmas trees (we decorate ours in shorts!) or emphasize Santa Claus.  Instead, they put beautiful nativities "pesebres" in their yards and in store fronts.  Kind of novel to focus on Christ at Christmas, isn't it!


To beat the heat, many Paraguayans go to a river to relax on Christmas.  We've pretty much assumed most of the Paraguayan traditions, so you can find us in the water this Christmas as well!


Gift giving is not a Paraguayan focus.  Most families only give small gifts, if any, to each other.  A favorite gift to give a neighbor or employee is pan dulce (fruit cake) or cidra

 Whatever fun traditions you might have in your family, we wish you a joyful and blessed Christmas celebration!

Comments

  1. Merry Christmas to you too! I'm curious if Evangelical Christians there do the pesebres too? Our contacts in ASU seem to avoid it like the plague in reaction to the Catholics. Curious!
    Hugs from the Chaco my friend! I love the marracas picture, by the way! You look so happy!

    ReplyDelete
  2. merry christmas!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Merry Christmas happy enw year

    ReplyDelete

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